In this document:

BCMANR Policies and Procedures – Version 2.0 – December 19, 2008

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.0 PREAMBLE
2.0 BRITISH COLUMBIA MÉTIS ASSEMBLY OF NATURAL RESOURCES (BCMANR) ... 1
2.1 PURPOSE OF BCMANR ... 1
2.2 REGIONAL CAPTAINS, BCMANR CHAIRPERSON AND SECRETARY ... 2
2.3 TERM OF A CAPTAIN... 4
2.4 MEETINGS OF THE CAPTAIN’S ASSEMBLY... 4
2.5 AGENDAS, MINUTES AND NEWS RELEASES FOR THE CAPTAIN’S ASSEMBLY MEETINGS... 4
2.6 CONDUCT OF THE CAPTAIN’S ASSEMBLY ... 4
2.7 CAPTAIN REVIEW PANEL ... 5
2.7.1 Mandatory Captain’s Criteria ... 6
2.8 OFFICER SELECTION PROCESS ... 6
2.8.1 Mandatory Officer’s Criteria ... 6
2.9 DECISION MAKING ...7
2.10 SUB-COMMITTEES OF THE CAPTAIN’S ASSEMBLY ... 7
2.11 DIRECTOR OF NATURAL RESOURCES... 8
3.0 BCMANR CODE OF ETHICS ... 9
4.0 REGULATION DEVELOPMENT ... 10
4.1 PROVINCIAL REGULATION ... 10
4.2 REGIONAL REGULATION ... 11
4.3 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATION ... 11
5.0 MÉTIS TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE ... 12
5.1 DEFINITION ... 12
5.2 PROTOCOL ... 12
6.0 COMPLIANCE AND ENFORCEMENT ... 13
6.1 COMPLAINTS ... 13
6.1.2 Written Submission ... 13
6.2 DIRECT VIOLATIONS ... 13
6.4 OFFENCE EXAMINATION AND WRITTEN DECISION ... 13
6.4.1 Examination Process ... 14
6.4.2 Consensus Principles for Decisions ... 14
6.4.3 Written Decision Protocol  ... 15
7.0 CHANGES TO THE BCMANR POLICIES AND PROCEDURES  ... 1

Map of MNBC Chartered Communities

MNBC represents thirty-eight (38) Métis Chartered Communities in British Columbia and is mandated to develop and enhance opportunities for Métis communities by implementing culturally relevant social and economic programs and services.

The Métis Nation British Columbia (MNBC) represents nearly 90,000 self-identified Métis people in British Columbia, of that, over 18,000 are provincially registered Métis Citizens with MNBC.  Recognized by the Métis National Council, the Provincial Government of British Columbia and the Federal Government of Canada the Métis Nation British Columbia is the official governing body of the Métis in BC.

Download map .pdf

In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court of Canada confirmed the constitutional protection for the harvesting rights of the Métis.

This Powley Summary was written and prepared by Jean Teillet. Ms. Teillet is an Aboriginal rights lawyer with the law firm of Pape & Salter. She is also the great grand niece of Louis Riel.

Two Métis men, Steve and Roddy Powley killed a moose in 1993 and were charged with contravening Ontario hunting law. The men argued that section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 protects the right of Métis to hunt for food. The case was appealed up to the Supreme Court of Canada, which ruled in favour of the Powleys in September 2003.

Harvester Survey

Important feedback needed for Harvesting data for Métis in British Columbia. All harvesting card holders need to complete their harvest Survey.  The survey will open on Jan 1, 2019 and close on June 30, 2019.

Take the Survey HERE.

Natural Resources Act